A Brief History of Bindery Equipment

Before books there were scrolls, before scrolls there were tablets. Circa 100 BCE, Early books were bound in India by threading leather cord or twine through holes in multiple layers of palm leaves or bark. But how did we make the leap from scratching scriptures onto palm leaves to the ornate books and bindery techniques we see today?

palmleaf2_mc78E_6648Book covers evolved from goat leather to pigskin, vellum and calf leather. Pasteboard covers did not catch on until the 1500s. Cloth book covers came about in the 1800s when British publishers began wrapping pasteboard in fabric to be stamped. This is the first instance of automation in book bindery.

Although the perfect binding technique was developed in the late 1800s, it did not rise to popularity until the 1930s when the first paperback books were developed. This cold-glue method quickly caught on and spread from Germany to England to the United States. The hot glue method was developed by the Dupont company in the 1940s, resulting in a more durable and long  lasting book.

The 1950s gave rise to plastic comb binding in offices across the United States. Companies began binding their own documents and reports using spiral binding. In the late 1960s, David McConnell Smyth invented a sewing machine specifically for book bindery. The “Smyth sewing” technique involved sewing through the fold of smaller booklets, then binding them together to form a thicker spine. This method is still widely used today.

 

img_9879.525c3c0be7788Perfect bind technology continued to evolve through the 1980s and beyond. Polyurethane Reactive glue was developed in the 1989 and quickly proved superiority over EVA, which tended to crumble over time.

Many would tell you that book bindery is falling away as e-books rise to popularity. Recent data would suggest otherwise. According to CNN, e-book sales dropped 17% in the UK while physical book sales climbed by 7% this same period.

Whether you are looking for a coil binder or a perfect binder, you can find it on WireBids. We hold multiple auctions a month to provide you with the quality used equipment you need to run your business.

WireBids Tip #2: Using a Watchlist

WireBids is a great place to buy and sell used printing and bindery equipment. Our website features a user friendly platform that allows buyers to connect instantly with equipment sellers online. Our blog will break down how to use our website to maximize your chances of winning a bid. Click here to view our previous blog entry on setting your Max Bid.

In most of our auctions, lots close in two minute intervals, 2:00 p.m., 2:02 p.m., 2:04 p.m. and so on. When you have your eye on several pieces of equipment, it can be quite hectic to keep track of each as lots close and extend. That is why WireBids has a “Watchlist” feature: To save you from opening up multiple tabs and potentially losing out on equipment you need for your business when you are focused on another lot.

Adding Lots to Your Watchlist

First, make sure you are logged into WireBids. Your name will display in the top right corner. This is also where you will find your Watchlist.

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Find a lot you would like to add to your Watchlist to begin. Click on the lot from the lot catalog. You will find a link on the lot page to “Add to Watchlist.” You can add as many lots to your Watchlist as you’d like. Remove them by clicking “Remove from Watchlist” on the lot page.

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You will receive email notifications about an hour before a Watchlist item closes. You can access this page by clicking “Watchlist” in the top right corner of the website. This is a good place to watch the auction close because filters out the lots you aren’t interested in. You can place bids from this page and even track the lots once they have closed.

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The ability to bookmark lots like this is just one of the features that makes WireBids a prime place to buy and sell used printing equipment.Check out our Help page for more information.

 

 

 

 

5 Tips for Getting the Best Price Possible for your Used Printing and Bindery Equipment

Selling used printing and bindery equipment with WireBids is easy. Our user-friendly platform connects you with a global audience of enthusiastic and loyal buyers online. Here are some tips to make sure you get the best price for your used printing press or paper folder:


Quality Photographs

Well-lit, detailed photographs go a long way. The more photos the better. In one extreme case, a lot with 48 quality photographs sold for $13,000 more than the exact same piece of equipment that only listed 3 general photos. Include pictures of the serial number plate where possible.

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Videos

WireBids has found that adding a video to your listings improves bids exponentially. Lots with videos of the equipment in action fetch better prices and receive more bids than lots without videos. Videos offer bidders assurance on the quality of the machine and add transparency about potential flaws. Take a short video yourself- we can help you upload it!

Quality Descriptions

Transparency is key when selling used equipment. Quality listings indicate any necessary repairs, number of impressions and other pertinent details. Buyers will bid more if they know the the machine has new rollers, an up-to-date service history or has been recently refurbished.

Shipping Information

Sellers who spell out shipping costs also garner higher prices. Listing palatalizing and estimated freight costs gives piece of mind to bidders who may be hesitant on purchasing equipment located on the opposite end of the  country. No one wants to buy a machine for a great price only to find that shipping it would cost an arm and a leg.

Good Communication

Reaching out to your buyers soon after the auction closes decreases the chances of a non-payment. Speaking with the buyers right after the auction ensures you can reach out to back-bidders in the event of a non-payment before they have a chance to purchase a similar machine elsewhere.

Call us at (888) 229-5733 or email sarah@wirebids.com today to sell your equipment with WireBids.

Perfect Binders : PUR vs. EVA Binding

Perfect Binding machines use two types of glue to bind covers and pages: PUR and EVA. For a long time, EVA was the only gluing option for perfect binding machines.

PUR (Polyurethane Reactive) glue was developed in the 1989 and quickly proved superiority over EVA (Ethylene Vinyl Acetate.) PUR required less heat, required less glue per book and was dried completely transparently.  PUR glue permanently bonds the paper without cracking or melting. If you’ve ever opened a book that lays flat it was most likely bound with PUR instead of EVA.

dsc_0055.57b33484783faThis machine, the 2011 Bourg / NewBind Adventure-PA Single Clamp perfect Binder uses the PUR gluing system. The single-clamp binder comes up from a cold start within 13 minutes to produce books up to 2 inches thick with spine lengths from 4.7 inches to 17.7 inches at up to 200 cycles per hour.

PUR takes a lot longer to cure than EVA, sometimes up to 24 hours, but once it does the bond is stronger and more likely to withstand moisture and heat. EVA cures quickly and makes for an easier cleanup. This glue can be re-melted over and over again which may be a downfall in warmer climates. In colder climates it has been known to crack.

Although PUR is a more expensive option than EVA, most printers agree that it results in a far superior end product. WireBids auctions perfect binders featuring both types for either preference.